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20130113
20130121
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Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)
that if they really want to create value and send their stocks higher, the best way to do that in this environment may be simply to buy another company. hence, the huge spike in m and a activity in the fourth quarter. i think it's big. this trend continues in 2013, if you ask me. but i don't want just to see more deals. i want them to be the right deals. buy, buy, buy. so for all of the lonely is ceos who i'm sure are sitting on the rooftops singing. ♪ matchmaker make me a match ♪ find me a match make me a perfect match so you can sing, yes i am a rich man to a very plaintive tune. the hottest theme out there, a steaming hot thing, housing. these two combined, business will be an absolute powerhouse. i'm talking about masco and fortune brands home and security. two makers of cabinets, plumbing fixtures and other housing-related products. masco is the largest non commodity supplier to home depot and i should point out that any deal to acquire fortune brands would have to be done later in the year because of arcane tax laws. that's the caveat. still, the timing. we are now witnessing a fabulous hous
of capacity and given the macro environment, given the cannibalization that tablets are doing with the expensive notebooks and the road map that is questionable. >> is there a road map that you see that gets them into the tablet and mobile space in a better way? you look at what is happening to the stock of arm, look at the stock of qualcomm, and these guys are nowhere in the same arena. >> that's a good question. they have the road map to get in. will they have a position of dominance? being the same is not going to be enough, particularly given a lot of oems over many, many years being accustom to them being basically sole source or a dominant proprietary source when you have an alternative where you have a multi source solution, some suppliers that use their processing from a company called arm. so it's going to be very tough. you have to have significant advances for oems to use your product. i don't think they that. >> what does this say about hue yet pack yard? what does this say about the news about dell with a potential buyout? i assume what is happening at intel is ha
and corporate tax it is time to change so people can keep their own money and foster an environment where businesses want to invest andreate good paying jobs. he would hike the 4 percent sales tax and some say like it up to washington d.c., is that right or wrong? i am dave asbin. we'll go to steve and rich and mike and john, you love this idea and think it is good for the whole, country explain. >> one of the scandal is not the deficits, but the fact that federal government collects 2.5 trillion. with the consumption or sales tax, this is the lone way we can limit how much money gets to the federal government and more businesses would be created and jobs and the federal government would not be penalizing our work and we would get more work and jobs. >> sounds good to me, rick, to you? >> here's the problem. i will not touch incredibly regressive nature of this. >> by regressive, it hits the poor more than the rich? >> exactly. put the brakes on a economy, imagine what happens here. first of all, to keep the revenue neutral, you are looking at a 20r 30 percent sales tax . add that to the
to improved market environment. which shows a lot of promise if uncertainty is removed. take a listen. >> $90 billion is sitting there waiting to get into the market. if we see confidence coming through from the political sector, the global economic recovery, this thing has legs. >> guys, barring what they called a terrible quarter in commodities, a lot of things working in their favor. margin goals being met, all that. >> i want to talk about something that david faber said, came on air and said the different stories, there was a lot of chatter on the web, they said the company was in big trouble. you said they were dead wrong. i almost gave him credence on air. i apologized to mr. gorman about that. that was a very good call. you knew that there were rumor amongers that were spreading things that weren't true. >> we were in the mid stl of the european crisis, we're certainly not in the midst of the same crisis. any exposure you had to the sovereigns were seized on. morgan was suffering from that. that was a while back already. >> how did you know it was okay? >> how did i know? >> yeah, how
to eat off of our meal plan, have to be able to provide a safe environment for the student that they're making those demand from. so, i --. neil: say, you have 25 kids in a class and one has these issues. >> right. neil: for the other 24, everything is turned upside down to accommodate. >> exactly. 25 separate kitchens? it is not plausible. it is not workable. like i said, with other disability as that are recognized by the ada there's a one-time fix. businesses can recognize that someone in a wheelchair would need a ramp. they can build the ramp one time. build an elevator and it is a done deal. how can you do this for 25, 30,000 allergis? these schools have large student populations. it is no the plausible. it is taking it way too far. neil: we'll wat very closely, ladies. thank you in the meantime. forget about apple getting crunched, a real problem, apple is no longer cool? i had enough of feeling embarrassed about my skin. [ designer ] enough of just covering up my moderate to severe plaque psoriasis. i decided enough is enough. ♪ [ spa lady ] i started enbrel. it's clinically
environment. >> they are more parsimonious today but he also said tell the truth because sooner or later people will find out. that is still a modern day public relations. ♪ [ male announcer ] how do you turn an entrepreneur's dream... ♪ into a scooter that talks to the cloud? ♪ or turn0-million artifacts... ♪ into a high-tech masterpiece? ♪ whatever your business challenge, dell has the technology and services to help you solve it. mortgage. married. two great kids. he wants to protect his family with a $500,000 term life insurance policy. what do you think it'll cost him? a hundred dollars a month? sixty? forty? actually none of the above. john can get a $500,000 policy -from a highly rated insurer - for under $25 a month. his secret? selectquote. selectquote is impartial. they'll search the pick of insurers like these to give you a choice of your best prices. selectquote has great savings on term life for women, too. john's wife carrie, can get a $500,000 policy for under $16 a month. selectquote has helped make term life insurance affordable for hundreds of thousands of peo
senator schumer said there is still a pretty tense environment here in washington and imm after the inaugural ceremonies up here on the platform, they go inside for the traditional inaugural luncheon where the president, speaker boehner and majority harry reid will be sitting down at the same table and wonder what that environment is like. i asked former bush white house chief of staff andy card about that remembering back to 2001 after that controversial election, and what the environment was there, here is what he told me. >> i suspect it will probably be a lot like the atmosphere that george w. bush experienced in his first term of office, it was a little bit chilly and cold, but at the same time, you can't help, but be wrapped up in the excitement of an inauguration. >> reporter: of course, that's what this really is about. celebrating american democracy on monday, tomorrow, the big question, what will the environment be like on tuesday morning, alisyn. >> alisyn: well, that's absolutely right. there is a lot of environment, john. thanks for showcasing that for us and we ca
a better environment for them, and that helps our citizens. neil: neil, i'm for an efficient tax system, but i recognize we need taxes obviously, and i'm just wondering whether it borders on irresponsible when there's so many republicans, yourself including, bobby in louisiana, and governor bob mcdonald and getting rid of the gas tax all together, whether you're fooling people? leading them to think get rid of the taxes and survive on minor adjustments in other taxes without creating a real problem. >> neil, that's not what we're trying to do. i made it clear the plan is revenue neutral and budget neutral trying to collect the revenue because we have a certain speedometer -- responsibility in government. neil: how can that make up for just entirely taking away the state income tax? >> because right now our state income tax collects about $2.4 billion, and we exempt $5 billion in sales tax exemptions so my argument is eliminate a half of those exemptions, and you get rid of the income tax. it's simple in that regard. now, it's not that easy because there are reasons for those exemptions,
&p are yielding more than the ten-year u.s. treasury, and that type of environment where dividends are going to grow 10% this year, that can be a good backdrop on stocks like ford that developed its dividend last week, lowe's on the home improvement side and dresser injuries and transindustries. >> with all due respect, jpmorgan out yesterday saying that maybe the dividend play is last year's play and maybe now is the time to get into riskier assets in equities because they feel like the economy is going to start to pick up. so you're sticking with the dividend play though? >> i am. for these two reasons. one, bill, the growth of dividends is the story. not the absolute yield. it's the growth in dividends and that can be names like qualcomm, apple, ford is my example. second. when investors look much like 1994 and 1999, when interest rates went higher, the ten-year treasury was yielding, was returning minus 3% for those two calendar years. people will come back to the stock market, but they will come back to the stock market in the safer yield and dividend-growing stories. that is why i thin
rate environment is very tough for them. you want to be cautious going into earnings. sandra: i told everybody you would be naming names. stock your portfolios with what you suggest here. you're calling for three of the 11 regional names to beat expectations. which three? >> well that would be mtb u.s. bank and fifth third and we think they are all in a position because of their mix of earnings, a lot of fee income because of merger in the case of mtb. those are ones where you could see them buck this trend of overall pressure on earnings. we think those are the places to be and they're high quality names. sandra: i want to tell everybody, m & t reporting this week on wednesday, fifth third is reporting on thursday. those are where you're calling for beats. six of them you are predicting of regional banks will miss expectations which six? >> we have a number of them. in fact it will be more than six. it will be across the board. we look at a keycorp and pnc, some of the other names where the net interest margin pressure because of a flat curve, much like wells fargo, even if they mak
are building on the money center banks. i actually feel the environment is still tough, maybe getting more friendlives can i ask you about the rally we've had generally? it's notable that goldman sachs has outperformed both the ac and citi with an 18% rise in the stock over the last month. today, of course, you downgraded goldman sachs in the light of that move. where are you on the sort of share price movement that is we might see in those three and oats moves forward? >> to see additional up side in a broker dealing, you have to see the economy get better. that could happen. i'm hoping it will happened. i'm just not sure if this is the time to put new money into goldman sachs, if we're sure not sure that will play its way out. it's just a matter of, how long does it take for the uncertainty to get out of the way, so companies can get back to making acquisitions. >> jeff, do people give you a hard time when you cut the ratings and yet boost the price targets? that gets made fun of a lot. >> yeah, we do get some for it. the price target increase, it's very form layically driven. what our p
typical of the urban environment that you're going to go into -- let's go back to aurora. those covering communities around aurora, colorado that it is an important conversation because they're sore consensus around the country above refer to its gun legislation that complements other things. it was defined in republican areas a lot of support for afterschool. the further away you get in continuing the conversation i would say you dispel a breakdown of cultural barriers because there are differences, your ranch in montana. >> on came to my ranch to go fishing and i said to my ranch manager, who is an avid outdoorsman and quite apolitical, owns a lot of guns, but primarily a traditional bow hunter. i say trade when it's coming at us to the has chief of staff ms. brittany secret service detail within. said i've got to go make a spirit i said no, they are going to let their guns. the secret service came and spent a lot of time and came back on other occasions to go fishiness in the secret service had my ranch manager bonded over it. >> respect do not and i don't want to use your ranch incom
of law and having order and creating an environment where people can thrive because there is that order. but also understanding we live in a globe where we should be the leaders and have to interact. that's where our children's future are is being a part of this global economy. that's not something we can easily avoid,host: galas on the. thank you for waiting. caller: right now i see that new york's services for the mentally ill are being sanitized because of the union's and pensions -- are being sabotages because of the unions and pensions. i just want to know why pensions are being blamed for everything. i pay into my own pension. host: ok. do you have a question, or is that your statement? caller: why are pensions being blamed for the budget problems? host: thank you for the call, gail. guest: i do not think pensions are being blamed, it is just a mathematical reality. when you look at budgets, obligations, there is no doubt that there are some areas and some places where we have overextended our obligations. we have promised to much. with the shift in demographics, in the financial
interest level in this environment. you have to wonder if the bank isn't holding on to your loan to maintain that high level of interest. i wonder if the might be worth your while to try to go to another bank and not refinance with the same company. it has become a much more difficult circumstances to get a mortgage because the banks are still recovering from all the bad loans that day made during the real estate mania. host: this idea of the debt to income ratio. that was something richard cordray talked-about. this is from american hero joe. explain this issue for us. guest: this goes to the heart of the ability to repay the loan. we do not want people taking on loans that they cannot afford to repay. 43% is the outside level. if your mortgage debt sure other debt -- car loans, credit cards -- exceed 43% of your growth or pre-tax income, then that is too much. that is a loan that is becoming too onerous and you might have trouble repaying. anything below 43% is acceptable as a qualified mortgage. anything above that starts to get into the territory of you are not having enough
of educational environment to include vocational training. it's been very successful. >>brian: general, what can the government do? specifically, where would the funds go? >> the funds really, we're not looking for that many public dollars. it only costs $3,500 per veteran per year to put them through this program. we have thousands of wounded warrior programs throughout the country. we think there needs to be a public-private partnership in reintegrating these veterans back into our communities. what we would like to happen is to, for the government to advertise our model and that it be adopted and adapted to the local communities. they figure out with veterans organizations and others on how to make it work inside their communities. we'll work with them very closely. >>brian: do you have a site people can go? >> nod.org. our chairman governor tom ridge is taupe talk to anyone any time about this program. >>brian: thank you for your service, what you did especially in afghanistan leading that invasion. lieutenant haggenbeck, thank you for joining us. next, if criminals want guns we'll get one.
returns, what you're telling clients for the next three to five years? >> in this environment, we're actually asking our clients to think about three things. first we're going to have low interest rates for awhile. so they need to adjust their expected returns. so in a low interest rate environment we're going to have lower returns across all asset classes. second, we're telling our clients that as they think about the lower returns in the context of their portfolios, they also need to recognize that we are going to have volatility from incremental policy on a global basis. whether it's in the u.s., europe, japan or emerging market countries. we are expecting that policy, whether it's monetary policy adjustments, fiscal policy, it will all be incremental. and that will create market pressure because it won't be at a pace that the markets would like to see. so that will introduce volatility. and it's not something our clients should try to trace. they should look over the horizon and invest for the long run. >> looking at the long run, three to five-year term outlook if you look at
regulated environment. so we take you quickly through a few studies that we've done that i think shows some very consistent patterns with firearms selzer accountability measures and the diversion of guns to criminals. the first one we published in 2009 was a study where we took the atf data from the 54 cities that had done comprehensive trace practices, had been in place in those cities. we looked at the state gun laws and we did a survey of state and local agencies to see what practices they engaged with respect to the oversight of licensed gun dealers and we did some regression analysis we control for a number of factors including other state done laws, gun ownership proxy's and the proximity to other states with weak gun laws. what we found is when you just looked at the states having strong gun dealer registrations by itself, it actually did not affect the diversion of guns to criminals. it was only having those in concert with a practicing those agencies of regulatory audit inspections and oversight of the dealers which i think it's quite interesting and important. we also found states
's the agenda. >> one what are the things you think you can do in this environment? by the way, i talked to bankers who say, you know what, i don't know if anyone's going to trust us. first of all i'm not sure anyone did historically trusted banks. >> agreed. >> and that it may never get that much better until, frankly, the economy gets better and the unemployment picture gets better. >> i would sake exception with never. i think there have been times in the past when the banker was your friend. you knew you could go down and get a loan if you needed to buy a house. you didn't worry about whether you could qualify. you worried about, you know, what house you wanted to buy. those are the types we need to get back. to frankly, banking's only one part of the financial services industry. this is a very broad, very wide industry. markets are driven based on people's confidence in their future, their willingness to invest in something they think has a better future than the current times. so earning that confidence. you know, financial advisers in our industry, professionals who work with indi
. [video clip] >> we are all products of our experience and environment. i have been tempered by the experience about war. what war means, the consequences, who has to fight it. all of that experience is part of me and how i look at policy, how i look at our foreign policy and military policy, how i judge consequences, how the world sees us, their trust in our purpose in power. no question much of the questioning i have done about iraq and was tempered by the experience in vietnam. whenever i will ever do in my life -- whatever i will do in my life, those experiences shaped me, just like anyone who has gone through war. those experiences shape you very much. it makes you less inclined to jump into war. it is easy to get into war, not very easy to get out, as evidenced by the johnson tapes. you need to think through these things. diplomacy is critically important, especially in the complicated world we live in today. i think something else is important here and a lesson we learned from vietnam. what is going to be very important for america is not to isolate ourselves in the wo
is going to keep giving or taking. the environment we live in is still conducive to be la tij jous because no one can make any money. carl, back to you. >> rick, we'll talk to you in a bit. rick santelli. >>> goldman is making waves with its bonus payouts. mary thompson has a flash. >> the company confirming that goldman has decided not to delay the bonus payments until april which would have allowed the bonuses to be taxed at a lower rate. goldman sachs' stock is slightly higher, about three-quarters of a percent. those payments originally due here in the u.s. in 2013 but the company, again, accelerated those payments into 2012 to take advantage of lower tax rates. again, the uk says -- someone close to the company saying that after some consideration, it will not be delaying bonus payments there to take advantage of lower rates. back to you. >> yeah, not the only bank where compensation is in the news. thank you, mary. >>> a few minutes left in europe's trading days. simon hobbs in less than 60 seconds. and i jumped right on it. tdd# 1-800-345-2550 tdd# 1-800-345-2550 since i've switched
environment and we're willing to take what measures are necessary to make that happen. >> gretchen: the move is legal under the state's concealed carry law. >> steve: talk about a hero's welcome home. [ laughter ] >> steve: that's terrific. a very happy reunion between this army soldier and his dog after he spent a year in afghanistan. his dog, jasmine, didn't forget who he was and she can't contain her excitement. the video was posted to the armed forces site, welcome home blog.com and has been reposted all across the internet. that is absolutely beautiful. >> peter: terrific. >> steve: meanwhile, a tale of two temperatures. warm here in the northeast and a rare winter blast out west. our own maria molina has been tracking it all morning long, trying to explain why it's 50 degrees right now in new york city. >> yes. very strange. good morning. good morning, everybody. we actual lea is a big dip in the jet stream out west. that's really the reason why we're looking at all of that cold air across the western two-thirds of the country. that's allowing all of that cold air from canada to sink s
proportionally because it was a real working-class environment which i grew up. so you didn't have mounds of food on your plate. and there were no snacks in our house. we didn't have potato chips or cookies. my mother would bake cookies once a week and then you'd have them as a treat. it was a whole different eating plan even though we were knocking back cokes all day long. >> with all due respect, i've heard this from joe, that's great that you ran all day. wonderful. that about the kids over the past 10, 20, 30 years who drank five cokes a day and didn't do that. >> is that coke's fault? that's the question. >> actually, it's part of a bigger problem just like the gun debate, okay? >> look, i have friends at coca-cola and friends at most of the soft drink companies. i think you've got to give them credit for at least putting this out there and saying obesity is an issue in america, and calories do count, and we're now talking about it as a result of them doing that. and it probably will generate some kind of a dialogue. >> i'll give them credit skeptically because i think they're covering thems
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)